This is how the European Union prepares for a “big blackout”. Germany offers courses to teach residents how to live without electricity

The European Union fears that a massive blackout will result in the loss of mobile phone signal, power and communications. For this reason, many countries are already preparing for the fact that their power grids may be disrupted this winter.


The federal government released guidance in early June to help citizens know what to do in the event of a major power outage.

Also, store food and water for 10 days, make sure the products you buy are as far from the expiration date as possible, buy gradually to avoid shortages, replenish food regularly, and monitor your pet’s needs.
Just in case, training courses “for life in the dark” are held in many German cities. “You have to understand what it means that nothing works, your phone is not connected, you can’t buy anything,” explains course instructor Birgit Eberlin.

The Belgian government also follows this strategy. There, the authorities help families to act and invite people to visit their website, answer a few questions and make individual emergency plans. Thousands of posters with the slogan “What if the virus stops?” They have been placed on the streets of the country. Blackouts are considered a “real danger” in this country.

Austria’s plan B to deal with “blackouts” is an emergency kit with basic food and hygiene items or medicines. In the United Kingdom they are also prevented.

There, BBC journalists wrote secret scripts and read them live to reassure residents.
Is the threat of blackouts real?
Many experts believe that given the current energy crisis, the ongoing Russian invasion of Ukraine, the increasing number of computer attacks on European systems and institutions, and climate change, blackouts will happen at any moment.

The Belgian government has also joined this strategy. There the authorities help families to know how to act and invite the population to enter their website, answer some questions and draw up a personalized emergency plan.

The Austrian Ministry of Defense has papered the streets of the country with thousands of posters under the slogan “What to do when everything stops”. In the country they consider the power cut “a real danger.” Austria’s plan B to deal with the ‘blackout’ is to have an emergency kit containing basic food and hygiene items or medicines.

In the United Kingdom they are also prevented. There, BBC journalists have prepared secret scripts that would be read live to reassure the population.

VIDEO